Posts Tagged ‘community broadcasting’

A luggage of equipment for women in Binga

2016/03/01

luggage of equipment for Zubo copy

Can you help add some funds to this equipment…? We are still lacking resources for the women’s subsistence during the multimedia training. The task is for the women to learn documenting their own work, daily live and culture of the Tonga people, and ultimately, to promote and market their local products, such as Tonga baskets, dried fish, soap from Jatropha oil or Baobab Juice.

We are currently running a fund-raiser in Germany supported by FUgE and Welthaus Bielefeld. Find the call-out (in German), further information and contact here: Spendenaufruf Zubo Trust Zimbabwe.

The project and its background:

Over the past five year, the local women’s organisation Zubo Trust has established successful economic empowerment projects securing the livelihood and self-reliance of women in rural Binga, Northern Zimbabwe. However, hardly anything of all this is known to outsiders. The BaTonga have been a marginalised community for long and Binga is far away from the country’s urban centres like Bulawayo and Harare.

Radio continental drift is soon joining the women of Zubo Trust in Binga as a “multimedia volunteer”. The media project with the women has been in the planning for more than a year. Recently, funds for some equipment could be procured from the German Boeckler Foundation/ Solidarity FundNow, subsistence of the women is our big worry – even more so, since Binga is badly effected by the current drought in Southern Africa.

All incoming funds from our call-out will be used to reimburse the women who participate in the media project and to help with the subsistence of those who wish to learn taking documentation and promotion in to their own hands for the benefit of the local community.

Here, you can listen to a podcast produced by African Women in Germany, which tells about the Tonga people and the women of Zubo Trust.

With your support, the women in Binga will soon be able producing their own podcasts and showcase their work and products on their website. Keep in touch with them here: http://www.zubo.org Thanks for listening and for your support!

Twalumba! from the women in Binga!

Radio continental drift

the new ZUBO

 

Passing on stories… in remix

2015/12/16

“It’s not just as if everyone is blowing their horns at any time; there’s a pattern and you can hear the pattern going and coming…

…one song for example is about a blind man, who went to Hwange in the year of hunger; he worked very hard and did very well and people got jealous of him, put poison in his beer and he died… – that’s the background story – even the small kids know the story…; but the lyrics are, ‘he drank the beer and he died’…

How’s this for passing on stories…?!

Penny Yon

 

 

Fascinated by the ways of passing on stories in lyrics, music and festivals in the BaTonga culture, three of the contributors to “The Women of the Great River” home in on Penny Yon’s and Esnart Mweemba’s descriptions of Tonga Music in clips 39 – 43 of the call-out playlist: The London-based painter, Alma Tischler Wood; the radio DJ and graphic artist, Terry Humphrey aka Trunkstore Arts, also from London; and the Austrian sound- and radio engineer and stage manager, Marcus C. Diess aka “Macussi” (his Tonga name).

 

'he drank the beer and he died" , painting/ digital print by Alma Tischler Wood

 

“he drank the beer and he died” – title of Alma Tischler Wood’s visual remix and, the lyrics of a Tonga song which Penny Yon introduces to us in clip 43 of the call-out playlist.

Alma Tischler Wood writes about her contribution:

‘I created digitally a pattern on the computer whilst listening to THE WOMEN OF THE GREAT RIVER (2) by radio continental drift. I was particularly impressed and amused by the subtle layers and rhythms of No. 43, Penny Yon’s Passing on Stories (…) I will create a painting (perhaps a series of paintings) of the pattern you can see on screen.’

A lyrics like “he drank the beer and he died” would be accompanied by a serial type of music, audio patterns as Penny Yon describes it, whereby drums beat the rhythm and the horns are each playing one note only and yet joining together in a musical pattern and composition – while the players would be at once dancing, sometimes running around, and the whole community being in motion…

A sample of BaTonga “Ngoma bontibe” music can be found on the Mulonga webpage (a composition by Siankwede Bokotela Mudenda; lyrics in ChiTonga/ English on the page, recorded in Siachilaba 1997, performed by the Simonga group); listen here

 

Lwiindi - photo M.C.Diess 2013

 

 

"BASKET" painting by Alma Tischler Wood

 

“…there’s a pattern and you can hear the pattern going and coming…”

Alma’s abstract composition seems to me working in a very similar way and manner. A pattern of same-size triangles in shades of grey tones (let’s say, the drums, “bontibe”) and primary colours (say, the horns, “nyele”) create music in motion before the eye. The triangle, by the way, is a sign and symbol common to many cultures on the continent and often used in decorative patterns such as on drums or on fabrics. The triangle stands for stability and balance.

 

Lwiindi_Speakers_cut - photo Marcus C Diess

 

 

The radio DJ and graphic artist, Terry Humphrey aka Trunkstore Arts in London created “Storyboard” (0:36) in contribution to “The Women of the Great River”. “Rapid listening and editing response,” Terry writes about his remix. The all-vocal piece could well function as a pattern, or a loop for a music, and dance – as it mainly draws on Esnarth’s chant from the Budima Ceremony which she sing as an example while telling about Budima. The piece also includes vocals from Penny Yon, Linda Mudimba, and Janet Mwiinde.

 

Budima - photo Basilwizi Bamulonga

 

Austrian sound- and radio engineer Marcus C. Diess created an intriguing musical encounter of women’s vocals from the call-out playlist and ambient recordings from the Lwiindi Festival, which “Macussi” (his Tonga name!) recorded on his visits to the Tonga community of Sinazongwe, Zambia in 2007 and 2013. In fact, Macussi’s skills were crucial in the establishment (2007) and technical updating (2013) of Zongwe Community Radio, as he was part of a team of community-radio-activists from Austria assisting Zongwe community in these tasks. Hear a broadcast by the station from 2007 about Lwiindi Ceremony.

 

 

Macussi aka Marcus C. Diess writes about his contribution:

“Recordings from my visits in Sinazongwe 2007 and 2013 (the Lwiindi Festival), Downloads from Continental drift . Hope Masike plays the Mbira Loops, the violine is played by Tony Stricker. Both live recorded in Bad Ischl 2014 by myself. Samples of a Kalimba played by me.”   Vocals from the call-out playlist include Penny Yon, Linda Mudimba, Janet Mwiinde, Agness Buya Yombwe, Esnart Mweemba, Barbara Mudimba and Viola Mwembe.

Do watch Macussi’s documentary to learn more about Zongwe Community Radio and the Lwiindi Festival of the Zambian Tonga in Sinasongwe. The first half of the film tells the story of Zongwe Community Radio; the second half, about the Lwiindi festival:

 

 

The film beautifully relates the BaTonga ritual during Lwiindi to go out on a boat on Lake Kariba and fetch water above the ancient Shines of the ancestors – now at the bottom of the lake. The women then carry the water in procession, accompanied by all the musicians with their drums, rattles and horns to the current Shines of the Chiefs male and female ancestors and share the water – together with locally brewed beer over the sacred burial grounds.

“The Tonga lost their land with the coming of Kariba but they have managed to retain much of their rich cultural heritage. The major threat has been the coming of some missions which preach that ngoma bontibe is of the devil. If these missionaries are to get their way and the Valley tonga are to stop performing their music, the Valley Tonga will finally have had everything stripped from them – even their unique cultural identity.”

For more about Tonga music, you may read the articles on the website of “Kunzwana”. I highly recommend the article by Keith Goddard “One man one note” from which the above quote is taken.

Women Empowerment… in Binga remix

2015/12/15

… did you ask yourself about women’s liberation in the rural communities of Binga in Zimbabwe…?

The contributions by Sirpa Jokinen, audio artist from Finland, and by Yes Afrika Women’s Forum to “The Women of the Great River” call-out tell us about it – based on the stories brought to us by Rosemary Cumanzala, director of the women’s organisation Zubo Trust in Binga.

 

the new ZUBO

 

“…it’s taboo! I can’t allow my wife to be in the public…”

Zubo Trust began to work with the women of the community in conversational meetings with the husbands, sensitizing the men for women’s issues, that was the aim.

“…but why are the women not speaking…?”

once first steps were done and the women were attending the meetings, Zubo continued gentle inquiring in to the power structures that be…

“…Women Issues are women’s issues! There is no way a man can pretend to be a woman…!”

even the men were coming to this solution, Rosemary tells us in the recordings.

 

Rosemary at Hamm station

 

It is this story – clip10 of the call-out playlist – which Sirpa Jokinen embeds in a resonant scenario with her remix. Listen to Sirpa’s beautiful accentuation of Rosemary’s story of women’s empowerment in Binga:

 

 

Today many women in Zubo Trust’s economic empowerment projects are able to stand on their own feet, fend for themselves and their families.

“…the women of the Kapenta project are even employers of men…”

“…in some families, women became the breadwinners; the husbands are taking care of the children…”

 

the "old" ZUBO - photo: Zubo Trust

 

So goes the continuation of Rosemary’s story documented in the footage recordings of the Yes Afrika Women’s Forum.

Podcast 5, contributed by Yes Afrika Women’s Forum, features Rosemary’s story of women empowerment in Binga and places it in a triple frame: Rosemary’s conversation and exchange of experiences with members of Yes Afrika Women’s Forum in Germany in June 2015; the story of Zubo’s all-women-fishery project told by Rosemary’s junior colleague in Binga, Abbigal Muleya (recorded in Nov.2012); and, the history of the BaTonga’s displacement from the river (using clips 2, 3, 5, 10, 12, 14 and 56 of the call-out playlist).

 

 

Craft Centre - women empowerment

 

ZUBO Trust is a women-run organization working with the rural women of the Zambezi valley in Zimbabwe since 2009. Offices are in Binga and Bulawayo. Zubo Trust has accomplished well-recognized work in organizing the rural women, establishing producer collectives, securing women’s lively-hoods, and boosting their independence and self-esteem. One of Zubo’s pioneering initiatives is an all-women fishery project. Further projects include organic agriculture, developing cosmetic products and, the local crafts, especially basket weaving.

 

 

Abbigal Muleya talks about the work of Zubo Trust with the women in Binga to radio continental drift/ claudia wegener, in a recording from 2012 in Binga outside Basilwizi Office.

 

office Bailwisi - Kariba Lake

 

 

“We are African Women in Hamm…”

2015/07/23

Hallo Listeners, we, the women of the Yes Afrika Women’s Forum, are now on the journey of a podcast and radio project… leading to a broadcast with our local Community Radio “Radio Runde Hamm” aired in September via Radio Lippewelle… Enjoy our Podcasts… while we are preparing for on-air…!

Hallo liebe Zuhörer, wir, die Frauen des Yes Afrika Frauen Forums haben uns auf die Reise durch ein Podcast- und Radioprojekt gemacht… es wird uns zu einer Sendung mit unserem örtlichen Bürgerfunk, der “Radio Runde Hamm” führen, die im September über Radio Lippewelle ausgestrahlt werden wird… Hört mal herein in unsere Podcast…!

“We want to tell each other about our lives here… and about the lives of women in the countries where we come from… we want to share our experiences in Germany, in Hamm… what are our roles, our duties, our rights… here and there…? Where, and what could African women learn from German women…? Where, and what could German women learn from African women…? What experiences do we pass on to our children, our daughters…? …and how do we do that…?”

“Wir sind Afrikanerinnen in Hamm…!”, ein Podcast und Radioprojekt realisiert mit Unterstützung von Engagement Global, Yes-Afrika e.V. and FUgE e.V., gefördert aus Mitteln des Bundesministeriums für Zusammenarbeit (BMZ)

Radio Communities without borders

2015/07/04

An update on the ongoing radio journey of the playlist of “Sonic Cross-Cultural Exchanges” of women artists

In May, Doctore Xyramat, FSK Hamburg, presented the playlist of “sonic cross-cultural exchanges” in her regular 13-hours show, dedicated to the music of female artists. Thanks to Doctore Xyramat, we are glad sharing here an excerpt of her on-air show (34′) which includes some of the remixes by international women artists, some of the original interview clips with women artists from Zambia and Zimbabwe and a telephone interview with Claudia Wegener/ radio continental drift (in German).

Xyramat herself specially prepared a remix for the broadcast involving near to all the clips of the original call-out playlist. Enjoy the listening! Remixes at Radio Chimeres Greece

And, thanks to Anna Stereopoulou and the studio team at Radio Chimeres in Greece, we now even know “The Women Sing at Both Sides of the Zambezi” in the Greek language and alphabet… On May 25, on the occasion of the global celebration of Africa Day, the webradio Chimeres Greece featured the entire playlist of Remixes on-air.

A Journey of Listening…

2015/05/04

A Journey of Listening/ Eine Reise mit den OhrenThe sounds here take us to a rehearsal of the Zambia Popular Theatre Alliance in the old Independence Stadium Lusaka… more than 260 young people drumming, singing, dancing… filling the entire stadium with sounds and motion.

Then, we visit women of the DMI Women Groups in nearby Chipata… they make jam or knitwear and sell it… and, they go singing and dancing through the neighbourhood edu-taining the people in the markets… sometimes, they’d even take a megaphone… I tell them that what they do is Radio already… “open street broadcast”!!

From there, sounds take us to Germany and to our African sistaz and brothers in Hamm during a party celebrating the establishment of the African Club, Yes Afrika…

My narration in the radio play is in German with the original recordings in the indigenous languages.

The entire radio piece (47’) … from an attic in Hamm, Germany… via Kampala, Johannesburg and Lusaka… and back… can be downloaded here  

The radio play is dedicated to community radio – in its many forms and shades – and, to the radio communities of “active listeners” it always forms and gathers; to my local “Bürgerfunk”, Radio Runde Hamm, to “pavement broadcasts” in Lusaka and wherever they happen and, to the community of listeners on Aporee Radio. First broadcast, 21 April 2015, Radio Lippewelle 105.0 FM ind online.

Playlist of original recordings with direct links to Aporee Sound Map

DMI women listening

Sonic cross-cultural exchanges

2014/12/24

PLEASE NOTE: Extended Call-Out for Remixes till 19 Jan. 2015

Screen Shot 2015-01-03 at 22.43.01

 

Remix Responses by Global Listeners to our Call-out are dropping in at our FB group THE WOMEN SING AT BOTH SIDES OF THE ZAMBEZI

DIXIE TREICHEL  “Celebrating African pioneer broadcaster and activist Mavis Moyo (1929-). I chose to create a piece with Mavis because I share her thoughts that women’s voices and perspectives in the media, especially broadcasting, are essential and very underrepresented. I am a broadcaster on community radio (KFAI) and know the importance of connecting with and giving voice to people who may otherwise not be reached or heard. For this reason KFAI celebrates International Women’s Day every March 8 with 24 hours of broadcasting women’s & girls’ voices.
 I mixed sounds from pieces I did on amateur radio and recorded some sounds from my portable radio to create the underlying bed for Mavis’ voice.”

SIRPA JOKINEN “I liked the rhythm of the woman’s speech about the African drum and I tried to find some sounds that would work with this tempo and the content.”

PATRICIA WALSH “The inspiring enthusiasm that can be heard in the voice of Joyce Makwenda in this short piece of audio is definitely a part of what made me choose it to mix with my instrumental piece, Lost Horizon. I felt this composition would lend an apt and atmospheric backdrop to her words because Joyce is talking about the Townships and their stories and by doing so bringing them to a new audience.”

JORDAN aka X-Wing Pilot Thomas “The narration of Mulenga Kapwewe describes the coherence through changes of rhythm and space, coexistence through capability, the gifts of your voices will make way for yourself. Also, there is a background coming from an Inuit throat singer, Qiarpaa, traditionally this singing is done by women together, the hemiola and phasing forms of the cycles overlapping (3+8+10+18) is universal in forms to people over the globe.”

DANNY THOMPSON aka Bass Oratory

KAT BPM “Hi. I had just finished a gig when a lady came up to me and gave me what i thought was a CD, turned out to be the links to “THE WOMEN SING AT BOTH SIDES OF THE ZAMBEZI”, Fantastic thank you I love the sounds… have used some samples in my Grime War Dub… its very basic track as I had only 24hrs to make it… but please have a listen, my track starts at 3.39 mins in (as you can tell from the samples).”

Where are you African names?

2013/05/18

               … in which clouds are you buried ?  The Black Poet  

 

Charity Nyelele · Ntando Gumbo · Sihle Ndlovu · Lindatumune Nyono Mudimba ·  Abigal Muleya · Barbara Mudimba & Viola · Janet & Luyando · Luyando Muyalali · Tyunga Women Drama Group · Florence Musaka · Mary Munsaka · Sophia Mutebele · the Pupils of Damba Primary School · Margret M Moombe · Sialwindi aka Jossam Munkuli · Peter Mungombe · Siamudenda Bertha · Mr Mwinde Kelias · Mrs Banda Zilas · Multeya Elita · Jos Martens · Christine Hankwebe · Ester Michero · Mtenda Luvinda · Rosie Ndebele · Sharon Sithole · Nothando Mpofu · Cont Mhlanga ·  Thembi Ngwabi · Priscilla Sithole · Hope Ranganayi · Thembele Hlachayo & Juliette Markara ·  Nonhlanhla Mathe · Sithandazile Dube · Ericah Gwetai · Soneni Gwizi · Angela Jimu · Annie Mpalume · Bella Katherine Tapezicier · Mavis Moyo · John Masuku ·  Anna Miti · Annah Mushaninga · Rudo Machairo · Rumbizai Dube · Vivienne Marara · Anesu Katerere · Penny Yon · Batsirai Chigama · Dudu Manhenga · Chiwoniso Maraire · Nancy Mukondyo aka Blackheat DeShanti · More Blessings Size · Ngonidzashe Tawiwa aka Upmost · Linda Gabriel · Mbizo Chiracha aka The Black Poet · Babara Breeze Anderson · Elizabeth aka Zaza Muchemwa · Joyce Jenje Makwenda · Virginia Phiri · Tashinga Matindike-Gondo · Currage Zvikomborero Chinokwetu · Ruvimbo Tenga · Faith Dube · Vimbai Y. Mapanda ·  Tina Rolfe · Sharon Mukebo · Thabit Gambire · Shieza Mzeza · Mayoba Aluta Gwaba · Pamela Ela Nyambe Kalimukwa · Kunda Mando ·  Mrs Namunkolo · Mrs Chitalunyama · Petronella M Kalimbwe · Chipego · Felistas Chipako Nwaneri · Mwaka Nyimbili · Mulenga Kapwepwe · Mulenga Mulenga · Zenzele Chulu · Tutu Matilda Mfumu ·  Mary Mutinta Manzole · Tasila Phiri · Yande Yombwe · Salome Nakazwe · Nicholas · Precious M. K Mungambata · Marilyn Kabalere · Rita · Yvonne Sishuwa aka Winter · Peter Nawa · Lydia Mwale · DMI women groups ·  Sitali Mayamba · Victoria Beenzu · Lorraine Hamusonde · Bellon Chintombwa · Esnart Mweemba · Patrick Mweemba · Yvonne Ndaba ·  Agness Buya Yombwe · Mwenya Muyeba · Barney Kanjela

Note: The page allows a quick overview and access to the archive of THE WOMEN SING AT BOTH SIDES OF THE ZAMBEZI at its current stage of uploading. It will be updated regularly with the new links. Links embedded in the first part of a name lead to a sample listening. Links embedded in the second part of the name to the playlist for the entire interview or recording.

Join our facebook group

Development Through Radio

2013/02/01

click here to listen to Mavis Moyo ))))) 

DTR Clubs Seke; photo: Calvin Dondo

“DTR Clubs Seke receive radios”; photo: Calvin Dondo

MAVIS MOYO is an 85-year-old veteran broadcaster with Radio Zimbabwe (Radio 4) and a founding member of the Federation of African Media Women Zimbabwe (FAMWZ 1985). Here she talks to radio continental drift how she got involved in the media and what it meant for her at the time (1954) as an African woman from rural Matabeleland. She relates how what became known as DTR or Development Through Radio grew from the seed of a collaboration and exchange between urban and rural women, initially between the Jamuranai Women’s Club in the Harare township of Highfield and rural women from Seke South of Harare. It is this relation between women across urban-rural divides, which developed into an early precedence of participatory radio in Africa to an unprecedented scale… See More

click for playlists (1) )))))   click for playlist (2) ))))))

broadcasting from LUSAKA & HARARE

2012/09/08

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