Posts Tagged ‘fieldrecordings’

Tonga Anthem… in remix

2015/12/18

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“…The River is for the Tonga people.

The river has fish and crocodiles…  

Our ancestors are ‘crying’…”

 

The above lines came via a quick text message from Michito Veronika, Zubo Trust’s communications officer, currently in the Netherlands, completing her MA dissertation. I had sent her the link to a recording asking whether the song following the Zimbabwe National Anthem was perhaps a kind of Tonga Anthem. “…oooh very nice. you have just made me miss home…,” Michito wrote and added the lines above in translation.

Listen to the recording here:

 

Award ceremony at Damba Primary School 2012

 

“The Tonga lost their land with the coming of Kariba but they have managed to retain much of their rich cultural heritage…”

Keith Goddard writes in his article “one man one note” (2005)

 

The recording of the Tonga Anthem was made in 2012, when I accompanied members of Basilwizi Trust  to an award ceremony at Damba Primary School. Damba is a tiny village, off the main road, in the bush-land near Manjolo.

 

All Africa Sound Map - Damba Primary

 

Together with Sihle Ndlovu, we recorded a number of interviews with women, in English and in ChiTonga and documented almost the entire award ceremony in Damba with recordings. Some clips from that day’s interviews are included in the call-out playlist such as by the young reserve teacher Florence Munsaka, and a Tonga song by Mary Munsaka, mother of one of the pupils.

Some soundscape recordings from the award ceremony are connected to the All Africa Sound Map like this Welcome Song by the Pupils of Damba to the arriving guests

 

Anthem - Damba ceremony

 

One of our contributors, the DJ Audio Storyteller, Crystal DJ Kwe Favel deeply identified with the stories, songs, sounds and voices she heard from the “The Women of the Great River”. Starting with the call-out playlist, DJ Kwe got on a journey of listening across many of the footage recordings from radio continental drift’s 2012 visit to Binga… a journey of listening which is still continuing as we speak and, will lead, so DJ Kwe, to an entire Album of her music dedicated to the Voices of Binga she heard…

The first track of her forthcoming Album however, Crystal DJ Kwe Favel is releasing already, here and now, contributing it as free-for download to “The Women of the Great River” call-out and CIRCE The Black Cut project/ Family Album. In her remix-contribution, DJ Kwe included two of the soundscape recordings of the Damba Award Ceremony, the Welcome Song of the Damba Pupils to arriving guests and, the BaTonga Anthem.

DJ Kwe (pronounced DJ Kway – means DJ Woman) is an Aboriginal Woman from the Cree & Metis Nation of Squamish, British Columbia, Canada.

 

 

Describing the samples used in the track, DJ Kwe writes:

  • Flutes – Indigenous to Native Canada/Turtle Island – Voices of our People – Sharing the Love
  • Frogs – symbol of transformation – recorded here on Native land. Frogs are Elders. Frogs live the balance between two worlds that often collide.
  • Damba Primary School Students – Welcome/Greeting Song – Special Tonga Anthem
  • Indigenous Girl Trill – Call for audio warriors to unite.
  • Tribal Drums – A common journey we share beyond the physical land.
  • House Beats – Electronica – a connection, a platform, a foundation to greet the world.
  • Synths – Inspire the world, together! Represents strength and power of positivity through nations across Mother Earth.

 

Damba ceremony gathering2

 

DJ Kwe writes about her contribution and motivation of her music:

“Our Native community is resilient; we have overcome slavery, displacement and documented genocide. It is in our blood to share our stories and oral tradition through audio. That is why it’s very important to introduce digital audio storytelling as another method to preserve our traditional stories and oral traditions. As we rebuild our family structures and heal from the generations of abuse, we are reconnecting through the use of modern tools. It is my goal to repair the hearts of my community through my music and writing. This is a motivational movement through electronica to reach for the stars, regardless of race.”

 

Announcement of DJ Kwe's forthcoming Album dedicated to Voices of Binga

 

The Album will be released on DJ Kwe’s own record label, Wax-Warriors-Records, in March 2016.

 

Siachilaba Baobab

 

“The People of the Great River”: The BaTonga are descendants of those who were forcefully removed from their fertile land at the Zambezi by the British Colonial Government in the 1950s. They had to escape into the arid, higher regions both sides of the Zambezi valley where agriculture is almost impossible. The land of their ancestors is now at the bottom of the Kariba Lake. Even after independence, water and electricity from the dam bypasse them serving others in the country. “Having lost everything, their culture survives strongly as a driving force of self-assertion, resilience and development.”

For information please also see some of the related websites:

Zubo TrustBasilwizi TrustMulongaKunzwana TrustTonga OnAirAustrian Zimbabwe Friendship Association

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Passing on stories… in remix

2015/12/16

“It’s not just as if everyone is blowing their horns at any time; there’s a pattern and you can hear the pattern going and coming…

…one song for example is about a blind man, who went to Hwange in the year of hunger; he worked very hard and did very well and people got jealous of him, put poison in his beer and he died… – that’s the background story – even the small kids know the story…; but the lyrics are, ‘he drank the beer and he died’…

How’s this for passing on stories…?!

Penny Yon

 

 

Fascinated by the ways of passing on stories in lyrics, music and festivals in the BaTonga culture, three of the contributors to “The Women of the Great River” home in on Penny Yon’s and Esnart Mweemba’s descriptions of Tonga Music in clips 39 – 43 of the call-out playlist: The London-based painter, Alma Tischler Wood; the radio DJ and graphic artist, Terry Humphrey aka Trunkstore Arts, also from London; and the Austrian sound- and radio engineer and stage manager, Marcus C. Diess aka “Macussi” (his Tonga name).

 

'he drank the beer and he died" , painting/ digital print by Alma Tischler Wood

 

“he drank the beer and he died” – title of Alma Tischler Wood’s visual remix and, the lyrics of a Tonga song which Penny Yon introduces to us in clip 43 of the call-out playlist.

Alma Tischler Wood writes about her contribution:

‘I created digitally a pattern on the computer whilst listening to THE WOMEN OF THE GREAT RIVER (2) by radio continental drift. I was particularly impressed and amused by the subtle layers and rhythms of No. 43, Penny Yon’s Passing on Stories (…) I will create a painting (perhaps a series of paintings) of the pattern you can see on screen.’

A lyrics like “he drank the beer and he died” would be accompanied by a serial type of music, audio patterns as Penny Yon describes it, whereby drums beat the rhythm and the horns are each playing one note only and yet joining together in a musical pattern and composition – while the players would be at once dancing, sometimes running around, and the whole community being in motion…

A sample of BaTonga “Ngoma bontibe” music can be found on the Mulonga webpage (a composition by Siankwede Bokotela Mudenda; lyrics in ChiTonga/ English on the page, recorded in Siachilaba 1997, performed by the Simonga group); listen here

 

Lwiindi - photo M.C.Diess 2013

 

 

"BASKET" painting by Alma Tischler Wood

 

“…there’s a pattern and you can hear the pattern going and coming…”

Alma’s abstract composition seems to me working in a very similar way and manner. A pattern of same-size triangles in shades of grey tones (let’s say, the drums, “bontibe”) and primary colours (say, the horns, “nyele”) create music in motion before the eye. The triangle, by the way, is a sign and symbol common to many cultures on the continent and often used in decorative patterns such as on drums or on fabrics. The triangle stands for stability and balance.

 

Lwiindi_Speakers_cut - photo Marcus C Diess

 

 

The radio DJ and graphic artist, Terry Humphrey aka Trunkstore Arts in London created “Storyboard” (0:36) in contribution to “The Women of the Great River”. “Rapid listening and editing response,” Terry writes about his remix. The all-vocal piece could well function as a pattern, or a loop for a music, and dance – as it mainly draws on Esnarth’s chant from the Budima Ceremony which she sing as an example while telling about Budima. The piece also includes vocals from Penny Yon, Linda Mudimba, and Janet Mwiinde.

 

Budima - photo Basilwizi Bamulonga

 

Austrian sound- and radio engineer Marcus C. Diess created an intriguing musical encounter of women’s vocals from the call-out playlist and ambient recordings from the Lwiindi Festival, which “Macussi” (his Tonga name!) recorded on his visits to the Tonga community of Sinazongwe, Zambia in 2007 and 2013. In fact, Macussi’s skills were crucial in the establishment (2007) and technical updating (2013) of Zongwe Community Radio, as he was part of a team of community-radio-activists from Austria assisting Zongwe community in these tasks. Hear a broadcast by the station from 2007 about Lwiindi Ceremony.

 

 

Macussi aka Marcus C. Diess writes about his contribution:

“Recordings from my visits in Sinazongwe 2007 and 2013 (the Lwiindi Festival), Downloads from Continental drift . Hope Masike plays the Mbira Loops, the violine is played by Tony Stricker. Both live recorded in Bad Ischl 2014 by myself. Samples of a Kalimba played by me.”   Vocals from the call-out playlist include Penny Yon, Linda Mudimba, Janet Mwiinde, Agness Buya Yombwe, Esnart Mweemba, Barbara Mudimba and Viola Mwembe.

Do watch Macussi’s documentary to learn more about Zongwe Community Radio and the Lwiindi Festival of the Zambian Tonga in Sinasongwe. The first half of the film tells the story of Zongwe Community Radio; the second half, about the Lwiindi festival:

 

 

The film beautifully relates the BaTonga ritual during Lwiindi to go out on a boat on Lake Kariba and fetch water above the ancient Shines of the ancestors – now at the bottom of the lake. The women then carry the water in procession, accompanied by all the musicians with their drums, rattles and horns to the current Shines of the Chiefs male and female ancestors and share the water – together with locally brewed beer over the sacred burial grounds.

“The Tonga lost their land with the coming of Kariba but they have managed to retain much of their rich cultural heritage. The major threat has been the coming of some missions which preach that ngoma bontibe is of the devil. If these missionaries are to get their way and the Valley tonga are to stop performing their music, the Valley Tonga will finally have had everything stripped from them – even their unique cultural identity.”

For more about Tonga music, you may read the articles on the website of “Kunzwana”. I highly recommend the article by Keith Goddard “One man one note” from which the above quote is taken.

Colonial divide-and-rule stories… in remix

2015/12/04

 

“…I’m also fascinated by the Tonga people because they are marginalized like I am…”  (Penny Yon)

 

Zim flag Tyunga School

 

The remix by sound-artist Inge van den Kroonenberg transports Penny Yon’s story of a “mixed race” Zimbabwean to another level and, “extracts” the painful awakening of the people after independence that Colonialism was not over, but in fact continuing in new guises… – though, at least in Inge’s evocative remix, there’s a “tongue in cheek” too; things are never one-dimensional… Coffee may be one of the first and major goods extracted by European colonialists from the African continent – the noises of coffee-making sound like an explosion to a nearby microphone, carrying the history of an ongoing colonial exploitation…; but, “the ritual of coffee-making is bringing people together” to tell their stories…

 

 

Inge van den Kroonenberg writes about her remix:

“I put the original voice recording on microcassette and mixed it with my coffeepot coming to a boil. By moving the microphone and tape deck around the stove the sounds of voice, tape, gas and boiling coffee blend together in a distorted murmur. I choose these particular sounds and the social/economical/political issues they are linked to; gas extraction, transportation of coffee beans and (the history of) colonization as a situation that is still ‘boiling’. But I also wanted to refer to the ritual of coffee making and how it brings people together to share thoughts and conversation in an intimate and familiar way.”

 

Inge’s remix also resonates, to my ears, with the sounds of radio communication.. even Morse code at the start of the piece… and again, as with the sounds of coffee-making, there is a double edge to the history of radio broadcasts, as a tool of oppression, or one of liberation…

 

Zongwe FM in Sinazongwe Zambia - photo M.C.Diess

 

Zongwe Community Radio, a Zambian station across the Kariba Lake broadcasting into Zimbabwe since 2013 supported by Panos Southern Africa, Basilwizi Trust and the Zimbabwe Austrian Friendship Association. So the people in Binga can now hear programmes in ChiTonga broadcast by their “cousins” on the other side of Kariba Lake. In Zimbabwe itself community radio licenses though existing since 2000 have not yet been granted. The state-broadcaster ZBC occasionally airs programs in ChiTonga, but the radio signals cannot be received in Binga.

 

Geography class in Siachilaba Primary School

 

…we are on the grounds of Siachilaba Primary School in the Binga district of the Zambezi Valley… listening to a geography class under a tree…

a clip from the recording also features in the call-out playlist of “The Women of the Great River”

 

Album 4b

 

 

A history of displacement… in sonic remix

2015/12/02

…told by Janet Mwiinde and Luyando Muyalali in Binga remixed by DJ and Radio Maker Lisa Greenaway aka LAPKAT in Australia

 

Damba ceremony 2012

 

It’s the history of displacement of the BaTonga from their ancestry land at the Zambezi, which Lisa Greenaway brings to resonate in her composition. In the original recording, Janet and Luyando are telling me about the meaning of a ritual whereby, during a public ceremony, a woman quietly went around the speakers splashing water from a bucket on the ground. Janet says, the water may refer to the Zambezi, life source of the Tonga people; and her nice Luyando adds that the water may be here a memorial gift to the ancestors, and especially those who lost their lives when the Kariba Dam was constructed by the colonial government and the rising water of the Zambezi flooded the ancestry land of the BaTonga.

 

 

The BaTonga are descendants of those who were forcefully removed from their fertile land at the Zambezi by the British Colonial Government in the 1950s. They had to escape into the arid, higher regions both sides of the Zambezi valley where agriculture is almost impossible. The land of their ancestors is now at the bottom of the Kariba Lake. Even after independence, water and electricity from the dam bypasse them serving others in the country. “Having lost everything their culture survives strongly as a driving force of self-assertion, resilience and development.” For information please also see some of the related websites: Zubo Trust, Basilwizi Trust, Mulonga, Kunzwana, Austrian Zimbabwe Friendship Association 

 

Damba- water ritual 3

 

As I first witnessed the ritual during a public ceremony in the village of Damba, I’d imagine that the water ritual may be part and parcel of many ceremonies among the BaTonga, including most probably initiation or weddings. The two songs in the remix belong to female initiation rites and wedding (as far as I’m aware…). One is sung by Janet Mwiinde, from, what’s now, the Zimbabwe side of Lake Kariba; the other, by Christine, Ester and Mtenda, three Tonga women from the Zambian shore of the Zambezi (though now living in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe).

 

Album 3

 

listen to the sounds of the “water ritual” at Damba Primary School

 

All Africa Sound Map - Damba Primary

“Binga nights” – Penny Yon in triple remix

2015/12/01

 

The nights, like all natural circumstances in Binga are strong powers demanding due respect from the rural community, “living according to nature”; “…make sure your cooking and your firers are done… because it is going to be dark!”

 

Kitchen inn the village of Tyunga, Binga Zimbabwe

 

The darkness of the night may stand as an images for the marginalized community of the BaTonga living on the northern edge of Zimbabwe, displaced from their ancestry land at the Zambezi by the colonial power’s construction of the Kariba Dam, now having to master life according to the arid nature of Zambezi valley’s higher regions.

 

 

 

And yet, this night is awe-inspiringly beautiful, the stars so close as “dropping out of the sky”… as the BaTonga are thrown back on to their forefathers’ rich cultural heritage and are shining a new light of resilience, cultural knowledge and development in to the darkness of history surrounding them…

 

Tyunga pupils, Binga Zimbabwe

 

Three of the international artists contributing to “The Women of the Great River” Call-out took inspiration from Penny Yon’s beautiful raving about the nights in Binga. The remix artists are Anna Leopolder, electronic artist in Germany; Jürgen de Blonde aka Köhn, electronic artist in Belgium; and Minneapolis radio producer Dixie Treichel.

 

 

0 album 2

 

The musician and arts administrator Penny Yon lived for many years in Binga, shared the lives of the people there, while working as project coordinator of Kunzwana Trust and the Tonga Online project.

 

Penny Yon - photo by Brian Jerome Williams

 

Audio journey through Binga…

2015/11/28

on route to Binga 2

 

…imagine yourself sitting in one of the local combi-taxies, watching the dry bush-land flying past, and listening to the echo of the women telling about their lives, Tonga culture, the history of displacement, basket weaving and fishing… including also voices from the other side of Kariba Lake, like artist/ researcher, Esnart Mweemba… and Bulawayo painter, Nonnie Mathe telling about her Grandma’s basket weaving and the inspiration of Tonga culture to her art making…

Enjoy the journey of listening!

 

 

Barnaby Spigel, composer/ producer/ DJ from the UK, created this 30 Minutes composition embedding the first 27 clips of the call-out playlist in a beautiful “audio movie”.

 

 

With vocals by:

the musician and arts administrator Penny Yon, student Linda Mudimba; Barbara Mudimba, a basket weaver and Viola Mwembe at Binga Craft Centre (translating Barbara); Mary Munsaka (Tonga Song); the teacher, Florence Munsaka at Damba Primary School; Janet Mwiinde and Luyando Muyalali in front of artifacts at BaTonga Museum in Binga; Abbigal Muleya and Rosemary Cumanzala from the women’s organization ZUBO Trust in Binga; artist and researcher, Esnart Mweemba, who belongs to the Zambian Tonga; Christine Hankwebe (Basilwizi Trust) singing a Weddingsong together with her neighbours, Ester and Mtenda (Zambian Tonga in Bulawayo); and Bulawayo painter, Nonhlanhla Mathe.

Find the original playlist here

 

Screen Shot 2015-11-28 at 00.04.21

Screen Shot 2015-11-28 at 00.04.28

 

Contributions to “The Women of the Great River”

2015/11/17

Mothers_atAwardCeremony_DambaPrimary_BingaNov12_rcd

 

We are delighted presenting here the names of international artists who contributed audio and visual remixes to “The Women of the Great River” call-out. We received 18 contributions by 16 artists of 11 countries; 15 sonic remixes by 14 contributors; two further contributors responded in a visual remix! 

In August 2015, radio continental drift had launched the open call for contributions in response to the newly released playlist “The Women of the Great River” which features “the story” of the Tonga people – a story of displacement, resilience and self-assertion – in the voices of women from Binga, a town and district on the Zimbabwe shore of the Zambezi.

On invitation of Athens composer, Anna Stereopoulou, we were partnering on this journey with CIRCE The Black Cut project.

Thank-you, also, to Anna Stereopoulou for inviting us on board of CIRCE The Black Cut project and initiating this exciting opportunity of joining many journeys and travellers in one moving moment of Listening. Thank you, dear co-travellers on the journey of listening!

radio continental drift/ claudia wegener

Here, now some lists of contributors and contributions; presentations of the contributions shall follow…

 

Contributors of Visual Remixes:

Agness Buya Yombwe, Zambia, “Cooking Taboo” and “Red Beads On The Bed” (feat Janet and Luyando)   •   Alma Tischler Wood, UK, “He drank the beer and he died” (feat Penny Yon)

Contributors of Audio Remixes:

Asymmetroi Faroi, Greece, “My mom” (feat Linda Mudimba)   •   Jürgen De Blonde [aka Köhn], Belgium, ‘It’s going to be dark’ (feat Penny Yon)    •    BroodingSideofMadness aka Joseph Ba, Greece, ‘Heart of Darkness’ (feat Linda Mudimba, ‘My mother’)   •    Crystal DJ Kwe Favel, Canada, ‘Tonga Anthem Remix’ (feat. Damba Students Welcome)   •   Macussi aka Marcus C. Diess, Austria, ’Lwiindi Water Fetching Remix’ (feat Penny Yon, Linda Mudimba, Janet Mwiinde, Agness Buya Yombwe, Esnart Mweemba, Barbara Mudimba and Viola Mwembe)   •   Dixie Treichel, USA, ‘Penny Yon – Southern Skies’ (feat Penny Yon) )   •  Lisa Greenaway aka LAPKAT, Australia, ’Water for the Spirits’ (feat Janet Mwiinde and Luyando Muyalali; Christine Hankwebe, and her neighbours Ester and Mtenda)    •    Terry Humphrey aka Trunkstore, “Storyboard” (feat Penny Yon, Linda Mudimba, Janet Mwiinde, Esnart Mweemba)    •     Sirpa Jokinen, Finland, ‘Rosemary’s Women’ (feat Rosemary Cumanzala)    •    Inge van den Kroonenberg, Netherlands, ‘COLONIAL HANGOVER / coming to a boil’ (feat Penny Yon)     •    Anna Leopolder, Germany, ‘Southern Skies’ original mix (feat. Penny Yon)    •    Ms Soli Tii, Germany/ Uk, ‘My Mums Basket’ (feat Esnart Mweemba) and ‘Simudenda Bertha’ (feat Simudenda Bertha)   •   Barnaby Spigel, UK, ’The Women of the Great River’ (feat clips 1 – 27 of the call-out playlist    •    Yes Afrika Women’s Forum, Germany, Podcast No.5 ‘Women Empowerment’ (feat Rosemary Cumanzala, Abbigal Muleya)

Contributors of the source recordings:

Simudenda Bertha, bead-making artist in Siachilaba, associated to Simonga musicians; Binga, Zimbabwe   •   Rosemary Cumanzala, director of the women’s organisation Zubo Trust in Binga, Zimbabwe    •   Christine Hankwebe, Administrator of Basilwizi Trust, Bulawayo Office, Zimbabwe, and her neighbours Ester and Mtenda (Wedding song)   •   Nonhlanhla Mathe, painter based at National Gallery/ Studios, Bulawayo, Zimbabwe    •    Linda Mudimba, student of African languages and Communication, Lupane State University, Zimbabwe; (earlier National Volunteer with Basilwizi Trust)    •    Abbigal Muleya, linguist, Monitoring and Evaluation Officer of the women’s organization Zubo Trust in Binga, Zimbabwe    •    Florence Munsaka, teacher at Damba Primary School, Binga Zimbabwe    •    Mary Munsaka, Tonga Song, Damba, Binga Zimbabwe    •    Barbara Mudimba, Basket weaving artists, Binga, Zimbabwe    •    Luyando Muyalali, student of African languages and culture at Gweru University    •    Janet Mwiinde, community elder in Damba, Binga district, Zimbabwe   •   Viola Mwembe, sales assistant at Binga Craft’s Centre, Zimbabwe    •   Esnart Mweemba, artist, designer, researcher, educator; previously Choma Museum; Zambia     •    Sihle Ndlovu, Student at Gweru University, Zimbabwe; (earlier National Volunteer with Basilwizi Trust)    •    Pupils of Damba Primary School (2012), Binga, Zimbabwe   •    Penny Yon, musician and arts administrator at Pamberi Trust/ Book Café Harare; Harare, Zimbabwe    •    Agness Buya Yombwe, visual artist, designer, researcher, educator based at Wayi Wayi Studio and Gallery, Livingstone Zambia.

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Go on a journey of Listening on the All Africa Sound Map

Screen Shot 2015-08-18 at 22.27.18

A Journey of Listening…

2015/05/04

A Journey of Listening/ Eine Reise mit den OhrenThe sounds here take us to a rehearsal of the Zambia Popular Theatre Alliance in the old Independence Stadium Lusaka… more than 260 young people drumming, singing, dancing… filling the entire stadium with sounds and motion.

Then, we visit women of the DMI Women Groups in nearby Chipata… they make jam or knitwear and sell it… and, they go singing and dancing through the neighbourhood edu-taining the people in the markets… sometimes, they’d even take a megaphone… I tell them that what they do is Radio already… “open street broadcast”!!

From there, sounds take us to Germany and to our African sistaz and brothers in Hamm during a party celebrating the establishment of the African Club, Yes Afrika…

My narration in the radio play is in German with the original recordings in the indigenous languages.

The entire radio piece (47’) … from an attic in Hamm, Germany… via Kampala, Johannesburg and Lusaka… and back… can be downloaded here  

The radio play is dedicated to community radio – in its many forms and shades – and, to the radio communities of “active listeners” it always forms and gathers; to my local “Bürgerfunk”, Radio Runde Hamm, to “pavement broadcasts” in Lusaka and wherever they happen and, to the community of listeners on Aporee Radio. First broadcast, 21 April 2015, Radio Lippewelle 105.0 FM ind online.

Playlist of original recordings with direct links to Aporee Sound Map

DMI women listening

Sonic cross-cultural exchanges

2014/12/24

PLEASE NOTE: Extended Call-Out for Remixes till 19 Jan. 2015

Screen Shot 2015-01-03 at 22.43.01

 

Remix Responses by Global Listeners to our Call-out are dropping in at our FB group THE WOMEN SING AT BOTH SIDES OF THE ZAMBEZI

DIXIE TREICHEL  “Celebrating African pioneer broadcaster and activist Mavis Moyo (1929-). I chose to create a piece with Mavis because I share her thoughts that women’s voices and perspectives in the media, especially broadcasting, are essential and very underrepresented. I am a broadcaster on community radio (KFAI) and know the importance of connecting with and giving voice to people who may otherwise not be reached or heard. For this reason KFAI celebrates International Women’s Day every March 8 with 24 hours of broadcasting women’s & girls’ voices.
 I mixed sounds from pieces I did on amateur radio and recorded some sounds from my portable radio to create the underlying bed for Mavis’ voice.”

SIRPA JOKINEN “I liked the rhythm of the woman’s speech about the African drum and I tried to find some sounds that would work with this tempo and the content.”

PATRICIA WALSH “The inspiring enthusiasm that can be heard in the voice of Joyce Makwenda in this short piece of audio is definitely a part of what made me choose it to mix with my instrumental piece, Lost Horizon. I felt this composition would lend an apt and atmospheric backdrop to her words because Joyce is talking about the Townships and their stories and by doing so bringing them to a new audience.”

JORDAN aka X-Wing Pilot Thomas “The narration of Mulenga Kapwewe describes the coherence through changes of rhythm and space, coexistence through capability, the gifts of your voices will make way for yourself. Also, there is a background coming from an Inuit throat singer, Qiarpaa, traditionally this singing is done by women together, the hemiola and phasing forms of the cycles overlapping (3+8+10+18) is universal in forms to people over the globe.”

DANNY THOMPSON aka Bass Oratory

KAT BPM “Hi. I had just finished a gig when a lady came up to me and gave me what i thought was a CD, turned out to be the links to “THE WOMEN SING AT BOTH SIDES OF THE ZAMBEZI”, Fantastic thank you I love the sounds… have used some samples in my Grime War Dub… its very basic track as I had only 24hrs to make it… but please have a listen, my track starts at 3.39 mins in (as you can tell from the samples).”

Women Artists from Zambia and Zimbabwe raising their voices

2014/10/14

Sithandazile DubeEllen ThandananiMufakose_BlackheatDeShanti_HarereAug12_rcd

Joyce and Lina

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

a special playlist released on the occasion of

Sound::Gender::Feminism::Activism 

October 16th – 17th 2014, London College of Communication/ CRiSAP, UAL

The playlist (audio: 35 minutes, 33 tracks, 78 MB) listen and download: 

part 1part 2

featuring clips of recordings with:

Artists of the Zambia Popular Theatre Alliance (ZAPOTA ); the playwright Mulenga Kapwepwe; the poet Blackheat DeShanti and Band; the cultural activist Ruvimbo Tenga; the Thandanani Women’s Ensemble; the writer Virginia Phiri; the broadcaster and poet Soneni Gwizi; the dancer, musician and actress Thembi Ngwabi; the late Mbira Star Chiwoniso Maraire; the writer and filmmaker Joyce Jenje Makwenda; the broadcaster and gender activist Mavis Moyo; the linguist and gender activist Abbigal Muleya (ZUBO Trust); members of the DMI Women Groups Chipata; the filmmaker Priscilla Sithole; the DJ Petronella Kalimbwe; the poet Linda Gabriel; the poet and actress Sithandazile Dube.

Our call-out for your contributions:

Hallo listeners, participants of SGFA and sista comrades in the arts!

We are inviting you to use the archived recordings of women artists from Zambia and Zimbabwe. Choose one of the women’s voices from the archive and mix it with recordings of your own. Please send us your 2-3 minutes remixes by the end of this year (upload online and post us the link). Your contributions will be part of an online playlist and special radio show that we want to publish documenting and celebrating this cross-continental audio correspondence.

We are here in our sound and voices!

Download the playlist cover and call-out here


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