Posts Tagged ‘struggle’

A history of displacement… in sonic remix

2015/12/02

…told by Janet Mwiinde and Luyando Muyalali in Binga remixed by DJ and Radio Maker Lisa Greenaway aka LAPKAT in Australia

 

Damba ceremony 2012

 

It’s the history of displacement of the BaTonga from their ancestry land at the Zambezi, which Lisa Greenaway brings to resonate in her composition. In the original recording, Janet and Luyando are telling me about the meaning of a ritual whereby, during a public ceremony, a woman quietly went around the speakers splashing water from a bucket on the ground. Janet says, the water may refer to the Zambezi, life source of the Tonga people; and her nice Luyando adds that the water may be here a memorial gift to the ancestors, and especially those who lost their lives when the Kariba Dam was constructed by the colonial government and the rising water of the Zambezi flooded the ancestry land of the BaTonga.

 

 

The BaTonga are descendants of those who were forcefully removed from their fertile land at the Zambezi by the British Colonial Government in the 1950s. They had to escape into the arid, higher regions both sides of the Zambezi valley where agriculture is almost impossible. The land of their ancestors is now at the bottom of the Kariba Lake. Even after independence, water and electricity from the dam bypasse them serving others in the country. “Having lost everything their culture survives strongly as a driving force of self-assertion, resilience and development.” For information please also see some of the related websites: Zubo Trust, Basilwizi Trust, Mulonga, Kunzwana, Austrian Zimbabwe Friendship Association 

 

Damba- water ritual 3

 

As I first witnessed the ritual during a public ceremony in the village of Damba, I’d imagine that the water ritual may be part and parcel of many ceremonies among the BaTonga, including most probably initiation or weddings. The two songs in the remix belong to female initiation rites and wedding (as far as I’m aware…). One is sung by Janet Mwiinde, from, what’s now, the Zimbabwe side of Lake Kariba; the other, by Christine, Ester and Mtenda, three Tonga women from the Zambian shore of the Zambezi (though now living in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe).

 

Album 3

 

listen to the sounds of the “water ritual” at Damba Primary School

 

All Africa Sound Map - Damba Primary

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THE WOMEN OF THE GREAT RIVER

2015/08/15

Janet_ListeningBack_BingaNov12_rcd

Deadline extended to 23 October!

Calling all Artists of Listening…!   

We are inviting you to respond to the voices, sounds and stories you hear in “The Women of the Great River”. This playlist features the story of the BaTonga – a story of displacement, resilience and self-assertion – in the voices of women from Binga, a town and district on the Zimbabwe shore of the Zambezi.

Playlist, part 1

Playlist, part 2

released by radio continental drift as part of “CIRCE The Black Cut” project. (56 tracks; 43 minutes; 57 MB)

Choose one of the women’s voices that speaks to you and mix it with recordings of your own. Please send us your 2-3 minutes remixes by 23rd October (upload online and post us the link).

Your contributions will be featured in the presentations of the CIRCE project in December 2015, which will include exhibitions, radio broadcasts and a new online album. Contributions will also be featured in the online sites of CIRCE and radio continental drift. The CIRCE project, as an open, interdisciplinary project allows for creative contributions of many kinds.

Please find all further details for your submission and the presentations in December, here, in the open call-out of “CIRCE The Black Cut”.

For questions concerning the playlist: please inbox radio continental drift, here on the blog or “Continental Drift” FB page. For all other questions and your submission/ details: please mail to sinetoaeaea [@] gmail.com

Rosemary listening

 

The playlist features:  Linda Mudimba and Sihle Ndlovu (at the time, National Volunteers with Basilwizi Trust in Binga); Simudenda Bertha, a bead-making artist in Siachilaba; Barbara Mudimba, a basket weaver from Kariangwe; Viola Mwembe, sales assistant at Binga Craft Centre (translating Barbara); the teacher, Florence Munsaka at Damba Primary School; Janet Mwindii and Luyando Muyalali from Damba in front of artifacts at BaTonga Museum in Binga; voices and sounds from Siachilaba Primary School, Tusimpe All Souls Mission Binga and Damba Primary School; Abbigal Muleya and Rosemary Cumanzala from the women’s organization ZUBO Trust in Binga.

The playlist also includes: artist and researcher, Esnart Mweemba, who belongs to the Zambian Tonga; Christine Hankwebe (Basilwizi Trust) sings a Weddingsong together with her neighbours, Ester and Mtenda (Zambian Tonga living in Bulawayo); the Zimbabwe painter, Nonhlanhla Mathe, and the Zambian artist, Agness Buya Yombwe talk about the inspiration they received through Tonga culture; and Zimbabwe musician Penny Yon, who lived for many years in Binga, shared the lives of the people there while working e.g. with and for musicians as project coordinator of Kunzwana Trust.

For details on Binga related audio recording in the online archive please read here: Binga Audio Collection 2012 and related

Pictures from Binga (2012)

“The People of the Great River”: The BaTonga are descendants of those who were forcefully removed from their fertile land at the Zambezi by the British Colonial Government in the 1950s. They had to escape into the arid, higher regions both sides of the Zambezi valley where agriculture is almost impossible. The land of their ancestors is now at the bottom of the Kariba Lake. Even after independence, water and electricity from the dam bypasse them serving others in the country. “Having lost everything their culture survives strongly as a driving force of self-assertion, resilience and development.”

For information please also see some of the related websites:

Zubo Trust – Basilwizi Trust – Mulonga – Kunzwana Trust – Austrian Zimbabwe Friendship Organisation

 Listen via the All Africa Sound Map

All Africa Sound Map - Binga

Women of Rwanda

2014/09/25

Healing Social Trauma Through The Arts

Carole Karemera tells us about the courageous journey of women in the arts in Rwanda, who, after the 1994 genocide, picked up the task of listening carefully to the needs of their society and the daunting process of reworking their historical “heritage” together with perpetrators and victims and the new generations. Read more here 

“It was a hard wake-up call…!”

“We need to educate all of us…”

“We need to keep Rwanda as a laboratory…”

Carole Karemera copy2014-06-19 16.51.33

LONG WALK abridged

2014/07/17

“…it has been written so that everyone can share my experiences… but it is not just my story. It is the story of all of us and our struggle to be free…”.

This is how Mandela was introducing the release of the abridged version of his biography, “Long Walk to Freedom”.

Screen Shot 2014-07-17 at 23.25.24

18 July is internationally commemorated as “Nelson Mandela Day” (Madiba’s birthday) and, as “World Listening Day”.  Joining celebration of Madiba and of Listening, I’m re-launching “LONG WALK abridged” a radio piece from 2007, based on recordings which I made in Johannesburg in March 2006. The piece had been “underground” and off-line for a couple of years now. At the time, it was broadcast by Resonance fm in London and across the RADIA network of independent radio station. I’m re-launching it free for download with a page on archive.org, linked to its original site on the RADIA website; and I anchor it on the All Africa Sound Map with a couple of clippings of previously unreleased footage from the original recordings in Park Station Johannesburg.

Our women’s media project needs your support!

2013/11/12

with Priscilla
singing Thandanani
We are calling for your generous support to our crowd-funding campaign which ends on 25th November 2013 !

We are Priscilla Sithole, a filmmaker from Bulawayo and Claudia Wegener, a German sound- and radio artist. Together, we are working towards a women-driven film- and media project. We want to train young women in Bulawayo as instructors in film-production and creative media. African women are still to become active participants in the so called “global information age”. THE WOMEN SING AT BOTH SIDES OF THE ZAMBEZI celebrates the power of storytelling, and the creativity of African women and places them – literally – on the global map with our online pages like the All Africa Sound Map.

The money you donate to this campaign will help us to produce a CD and DVD publication to showcase the project’s resulting films and audio recordings. A majority of our local contributors and audiences have still little to no access to the Internet and the online audio-resources of our project. Hardcover publications are  as important as local screening events of our films to reach our audiences in Zimbabwe itself.

Special thank-you gifts will be sent to all our supporters!

Please join us and support our project today !

Click to download flyer (english)

Click to download flyer (german)

Screen Shot 2013-08-26 at 13.57.19  

An audio archive in the making…

2013/04/28

THE WOMEN SING AT BOTH SIDES OF THE ZAMBEZI

Janet listening to her interviewHallo Listeners! Welcome to “The Women Sing at Both sides of the Zambezi”, an archive of life-story-telling established by African women for their sisters, and brothers, near and far. More than 70 interviews with women in Arts, Culture and Media from Zambia and Zimbabwe are awaiting uploading. Each week more links to on-line audio will be shared via the project blog. The collections from Binga, Bulawayo, Harare, Kitwe, Livingstone, Lusaka, Masvingo, Mazabuka and Monze are a beginning. The archive is open … and the Zambezi is a long stream… For more details and how you can join, read here

You are welcome to join our facebook group for updates 

Development Through Radio

2013/02/01

click here to listen to Mavis Moyo ))))) 

DTR Clubs Seke; photo: Calvin Dondo

“DTR Clubs Seke receive radios”; photo: Calvin Dondo

MAVIS MOYO is an 85-year-old veteran broadcaster with Radio Zimbabwe (Radio 4) and a founding member of the Federation of African Media Women Zimbabwe (FAMWZ 1985). Here she talks to radio continental drift how she got involved in the media and what it meant for her at the time (1954) as an African woman from rural Matabeleland. She relates how what became known as DTR or Development Through Radio grew from the seed of a collaboration and exchange between urban and rural women, initially between the Jamuranai Women’s Club in the Harare township of Highfield and rural women from Seke South of Harare. It is this relation between women across urban-rural divides, which developed into an early precedence of participatory radio in Africa to an unprecedented scale… See More

click for playlists (1) )))))   click for playlist (2) ))))))

FOR THE INFORMATION AGE

2012/05/11

http://www.creativeafricanetwork.com/page/36681/en

“REMIXING AFRICAN ORAL HISTORY”

2011/05/03

>>The DURBAN SINGS rough radio mix 

was release on Gruenrecorder label in December 2010; a movie trailer hosting the work followed in January. The trailer is packaged in an article  Creative Africa Network – REMIXING AFRICAN ORAL HISTORY on Creative Africa Network where a re-mix tree provides access to the work’s multiple contributions celebrating the pioneering achievements of the DURBAN SINGS project and the people who continue to further the production of its vision.

“Global Voices” published a Review on the “trailers for a road movie”-project in December 2010. Deepdish “Waves of Change” also featured the trailers.

An Ear On The Ground

2010/10/22

trailers for a “road movie” from the streets of AFRICA

still from “SAUTI NAIROBI”

click to watch:

>>EMBOOZI YA KAMPALA – Kampala Conversations

>>DURBAN SINGS rough radio mix

>>SAUTI NAIROBI – Nairobi Conversations

>>DWAN LUGULU – Gulu Songs of Wisdom (part 1)

>>Gulu Songs of Wisdom (part 2)

>>AFRICA in the Belly of the Beast (Brixton)


You Can Explore & Use the Archived Audio:

Original recordings re-mixed in the audio tracks of the trailers can be accessed, downloaded & used under creative commons share-alike license. They are archived as part of an on-going conversational journey to “Africa” & audio media road workshop across the continent.

The audio playlists on www.archive.org are meant to introduce artists & organisations and the cultural, activist and socio political scenes as encountered by radio continental drift at the time.

We hope that their slow broadcast from the archives may already reach open ears & join like minds, while more complete sets of recordings are still being edited & uploaded.

Your comments & questions will feed the fire. Re-broadcasts & re-mixes can become a starting point for further audio correspondence. Do get in touch if our words & songs strike a common cord.

Thank you for listening!

radio communities/ list of contacts

*****

a broad casting house in the bag of a listener


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